Let’s Write a Haiku

Inspired by a recent spring day filled with happy moments, I penned this haiku ~

April drive with Mom

Yellow forsythia blooms

All roads lead back home

You probably tried your hand at writing haiku poetry in a classroom long ago. In honor of National Poetry Month, could I entice you to explore your creativity and try it again today?

To refresh your memory, a haiku (pronounced hi-koo) is a form of Japanese poetry. Traditionally, a haiku is about nature and has just three short lines that don’t rhyme. The first and third lines have five syllables, and the second line has seven syllables. Do you remember tapping your pencil on the desk to count syllables?

Haiku poetry can be traced back to 9th century Japan and was a way of celebrating the natural world. Matsuo Basho wrote this oft translated haiku in the 1600s ~

An old silent pond

A frog jumps in the water

Splash! Silence again

I always looked forward to teaching a unit on haiku poetry. Even the most reluctant students enjoyed it, especially when I brought out the cardboard box of individual watercolor sets and urged them to illustrate their poems. Their work made the most beautiful spring bulletin boards!

Knowing my love for poetry, my husband often writes me poems. He casually leaves them for me to find on post-it notes and torn sheets of notebook paper. They are written in the same distinctive handwriting that made my heart skip a beat when he passed me a note in high school.

A quiet rebel, he usually breaks the rules of haiku poetry, so we call his poems Mikus. Just like Mike, they are always sweet, often funny, and sometimes romantic like this favorite ~

Wooden rocking chairs

Sitting on the porch with you 

Forever and ever

Nothing would please me more than knowing you were inspired to write your own haiku. Go outside, or look out the window, and find something in nature to write about. Follow the rules, or don’t. Artistic rules are made to be broken. For extra credit, get out some colored pencils, crayons, or watercolors and make a picture to go along with your poem.

National Poetry Month is a perfect time to be creative. I understand if you want to keep it private, but I would love to read your haiku in the comments. I know from experience your poem will spark creativity in others and invite us all to look at the world in a more beautiful, artistic way. §

 

 

6 thoughts on “Let’s Write a Haiku

      1. Your welcome here is another one written just now:

        As blood drips from
        A knife a poet’s words flow from their
        Heart onto the page

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Hello I’m a self taught poet and I’ve been mostly writing in this style for just over a year now. It isn’t strictly Haiku since it doesn’t follow the 5-7-5 pattern; making me bit hesitant to post on this page. So I decided to test the waters so to speak by taking you up on your challenge and your positive response has encouraged me to add this tag to my poems.

        Btw my wife and I are also empty nesters and reside in Bremen Georgia and are the grandparents of a granddaughter who will be nine months old in two weeks on my 60th birthday.

        Liked by 1 person

  1. Thanks so much for sharing your poems. Poetry can take so many forms, and even the greatest poets often broke the haiku “rules”. We are close to the same age and probably have many things in common. I look forward to seeing more of your writing…great imagery! 🙂

    Like

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