The Empty Nest

 

A plump, orange-breasted bird and her mate began building a nest atop a porch light of a house that sits on a gravel road aptly named Robin Drive. The middle-aged couple moving into the home didn’t notice the birds gathering the grass, twigs, and mud necessary for the perfect nest. They were busy feathering their own.

The robin was peacefully resting in her finished nest when the lady walked around the corner of the house carrying an armload of empty boxes. She came nearly eye-to-eye with the bird, startling them both into brief hysterical flapping. The robin gave a sharp alarm call, “Peek! Peek!” and flew to a nearby tree.

The anxious bird was relieved to see the woman and her husband study the nest with a sense of reverence and mystique. She felt sure the nest on Robin Drive was a safe place to lay her eggs, one each day for four consecutive days.

The next three weeks or so, the robin felt like a welcomed guest. The people avoided disturbing her as they worked around their new home. The lady made a habit of tip-toeing a few feet away from the nesting bird and whispering, “Hi, Little Mama, I’m sorry to bother you.”

When the robin flew off in search of food, the man carefully photographed the four sky-blue eggs inside the nest. Once the beautiful eggs hatched, they watched the blind, featherless brood instinctively open their mouths, trusting their parents would feed them almost continuously.

The robin knew time with her sweet babies would be brief. As she whistled them a lullaby in the protection of their nest, she reminded herself of the two lasting gifts she would give them ~ roots and wings.

The lady sympathized with the mother robin when the babies were big enough to hop out of the nest, but not yet strong enough to fly well. It’s a dangerous time for the fledglings. The day the little birds were capable of flying completely on their own was bittersweet.

It was May when the lady saw the robin hopping around the yard near the birdbath. “Hi, Little Mama,” she said. Looking at the empty nest on the porch light, she confided, “I know just how you feel.”

She sat down on a tree stump and was quiet for a minute. “You were a good mother,” she said. “They’re going to be just fine.” Perched on the edge of the birdbath, the robin sang them a rich and comforting tune.

 

2 thoughts on “The Empty Nest

  1. This literally made me tear up. The hubs and I had a come to Jesus talk last night about our marriage and where we are in life right now. We love each other, and we are definitely thankful to be in each other’s lives, but we are in the thick of child rearing right now, sometimes, ashamedly longing for the days that we too will be empty nesters. Then I read this, and was reminded how blessed I am to have the chance to raise whole human beings with the man I love. Tired and exhausted most days, but it is soooooo worth it in the end. Thanks for the beautifully crafted reminder. I enjoyed reading this!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Andrea! I just know that you and that husband of yours are fantastic parents who guide with wisdom and love. Motherhood ain’t for wimps! I will say you and the hubs are in for a wonderful chapter once the nest is empty, but you’re right to enjoy every minute. 🙂

      Like

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